Flashback to Middle and High School

I remember really vividly what it was like to be a middle schooler. Maybe it’s because I’ve worked with middle schoolers since I got out of college, or maybe it’s because the memories are just that emotional that they are forever etched in my brain. I remember wondering almost every minute of the day what everyone was thinking about me. I remember wanting desperately to blend in while wanting desperately to be noticed. I hated standing at least a head above every other student and most teachers. I hated that I had to wear dorky shoes because my feet were fully grown in 5th grade. I hated my chubby knees. I hated my huge nose.

I remember really vividly what it was like to be a high schooler. Maybe it’s because I work at a high school and daily take in the sights, smells, and sounds, or maybe it’s because they were really formative years that stick in the memory bank. I remember wondering almost every minute of the day what someone was thinking about me. I remember wanting desperately to be a Christ-follower while wanting to be accepted by the popular crowd. I remember wanting to make a difference in my world, but wanting to blend into the world. I hated my thighs. I hated my bra size. I hated that my huge nose hadn’t shrunken in spite of all my dieting.

Middle and High school are tough years for everyone. I know it’s different tough for guys and gals, but I can only speak for the gals. There is so much pressure to be the right size, dress the right way, be well-rounded, be smart… and the list goes on. It’s nearly impossible for girls to not be overwhelmed with fears, doubts, insecurities, comparisons, and often lies.

Girls (and guys, I don’t mean to leave you out) need a voice of reason and truth to remind them that they are loved, that they are amazing, that they have a purpose in this big world that’s bigger than their small worlds.

Sometimes that voice comes from a parent, a youth group leader, a teacher, a mentor, a friend. On rare occasions, it comes from an awesome book.

Today, my friend Annie releases an AMAZING book called Perfectly Unique that’s geared for teenage gals. This book is a reminder about how much God loves His creation. It is funny, wise, endearing, and full of truths that young women need to know. I waffled between being in stiches and being in tears while reading this gem.

I wish I’d had this book when I was younger. I think I would have felt more ok in my skin. I wish I’d had this book when I was in youth ministry, I think I would have had better language with which to talk to my gals.

If you are a mother to girls, a youth pastor, a teacher, a coach, a youth leader, a mentor, you should really get your hands on this book.

Because I feel so strongly that you should get your hands on this book, I’m doing a book giveaway (Annie will sign and send you her book). If you comment on this blog (this could be by sharing your most embarrassing middle school moment, or simply acknowledging that you want to be entered in the drawing), you get entered once into the drawing. If you share this post on facebook, you get entered once into the drawing. If you retweet this, you get entered once into the drawing. If you do all three, yes, you get entered 3 times, increasing the likelihood of winning. You are so smart!

So here’s the deal, if you have a middle schooler or high schooler in your life, give them a hug. Listen to their chatter. Earn the right to speak truth and goodness into their lives. They love attention, make sure you give it to them! And please, do get yourself a copy of this book, who knows what life change this could spark in the amazing young women in your life!

Ps, the drawing was completed 9/5. Grand prize winner was Ms. Karen McGee!

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About allisonbuzard

Follower of Christ. Wife. Social Worker. http://twitter.com/AllisonBuzard
This entry was posted in Book Recommendations, Walking with God, Women. Bookmark the permalink.

23 Responses to Flashback to Middle and High School

  1. Thanks for the book recommendation. :) My beautiful girl started high school this year and her father and I attempt to remind her daily how gifted she is. It will be nice to give her another outside source that does the same. :)

  2. Nate and Molly says:

    I would love to give this book to my cousin. I feel like she could really be blessed by her message. I’ll never forget in 7th grade when some girls invited me to the mall. Later that day I heard them invite a girl with a mental disability and then laugh behind her back, joking that they weren’t going to show up. I was crushed. MS and HS are such formative years and yet so lonely for so many girls.

  3. Karen McGee says:

    I started off middle school on a WALKER…how’s that for an embarrassing start to a story?? You’ll be lucky if you get to hear the rest of that story sometime.

    I want to win Annie’s book! So much so that I’m even going to tweet this out…whoa!

  4. Emily says:

    I had more than one girl threaten to kill me in middle school. I was literally afraid for my life in 7th grade. But 8th was my favorite year of school ever. The emotional roller coaster that is the hormones of a brand new teenager!
    I also work with youth and love them beyond words. I’d love any help with how to communicate to them that they are good enough just the way they are!

  5. Bethany Morrill says:

    I would love to win this book! Middle school and high school were hard, hard years for me, and I want to find a way to help my daughters be comfortable in their skin at an earlier age. And Allison – I know I’m shorter than you, but I reached my full adult height and shoe size by 5th grade and towered over all the boys and could never find cute shoes to wear. Oh, the growing pains!

  6. Kim Rodgers says:

    You know I could use something like this! I remember vividly how mean girls can be in junior high and how desperately I wanted to fit in once high school rolled around. With a daughter entering junior high age and with taking on high school Sunday School all by myself…this could be a good resource!

  7. Ashley Grigg says:

    I teach a small group for high school girls. Sounds like I need to get ahold of this book! So I guess I’m throwing my name in the hat for the drawing. Thanks! :)

  8. Lisa says:

    If I win the book I promise to share it with Kim!

    • Lisa, I DO love sharing but unfortunately, you don’t get entered extra for fruits of the spirit! We’ll just have to pray God honors your kind spirit :). You have been entered!

  9. bette harpster says:

    Allison, I love your blog! Even as an old retired broad, I can relate to so much of what you say. Those old feelings of insecurity and wanting to be accepted are life time issues for so many women. As a grandma of two sweet girls and the mother-in-law of a MFT who works with girls, I would love to be entered! Thank you so much for the time and effort you put into your writing.

  10. Shilo says:

    If I didn’t know any better I’d have thought you wrote about my middle/high school experience. Yet, since I was there, I know our experiences were just painfully similar. A pair of flat chested, big footed Twin Towers. Haha. I know we’ve talked about this before, but I wish I wouldn’t have been too wrapped up in my own self inflicted drama to see you were struggling with the same exact things. You were just better at hiding your insecurities than I was. That, and I didn’t think it was possible for someone so gorgeous and put together to feel that way. I will be forever grateful for the love and friendship you showed me and will be forever ashamed I wasn’t in tune with your quiet suffering to give you the support you needed. I continue to admire your bravery in writing about the topics everyone needs to discuss but usually get avoided. I love you, Shuey! :)

    • Oh Shilo, I think about you often and get pangs of wishing we lived closer. I loved sharing high school with you and I loved how vulnerable you were. It was on me for not sharing my struggles and acting like I had it all together when I didn’t. While you were admiring my put-togetherness I was admiring your brave vulnerability. Iove you always and am so proud of the strong beautiful woman that you are!

  11. Barb Hesterberg says:

    sOUNDS LIKE A GREAT BOOK aLLISON STILL WORKING WITH THOSE KIDS ATY cRIDER SOUNDS PERFECT FOR ONE OF MY TEENS , HER dAD IS A MINISTER. So a really faith based family. Nice to keep in touch

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